ASLO Aquatic Sciences Meeting: Vanishing Glaciers - Consequences for Aquatic Ecosystems

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ASLO Aquatic Sciences Meeting: Vanishing Glaciers - Consequences for Aquatic Ecosystems

Eran Hood
Dear colleague,

As you may know, the call for abstract submission for the *2013 ASLO
Aquatic Sciences Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana*
(http://aslo.org/meetings/neworleans2013/), has started. In case you
plan to attend, I would like to draw your attention to our special
session *SS22: Vanishing Glaciers: Consequences for Aquatic Ecosystems*
and invite you to submit an abstract. This session intends to provide an
interdisciplinary forum and bring together aquatic scientists assessing
the consequences of vanishing glaciers for the hydrology,
biogeochemistry, biodiversity, and ecological function of glacier-fed
streams, lakes, and near-shore marine ecosystems (see below for the
session summary).

 

The abstract submission deadline is *Friday, 5 October 2012* and the
meeting will be held on 17-22 February 2013. Online submission
procedures and more details can be found on the conference website:
http://aslo.org/meetings/neworleans2013/start_process.html

 

Please feel free to distribute this information to people you think
might be interested.

 

We look forward to hearing from you and hope that you can join the
conference,

Ruben Sommaruga, Tom Battin, Eran Hood


    SS22: Vanishing Glaciers: Consequences for Aquatic Ecosystems

/Conveners:/ Ruben Sommaruga, University of Innsbruck, Institute of
Ecology, Innsbruck, Austria, [hidden email]
<mailto:[hidden email]>; Tom Battin, University of Vienna,
Department of Limnology, Vienna, Austria, [hidden email]
<mailto:[hidden email]>; Eran Hood, University of Alaska
Southeast, Environmental Science Program, Juneau, USA,
[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>

Session Summary:

The rapid current retreat of glaciers constitutes one of the most prominent
signs of climate change. Most glaciers are expected to significantly shrink
within a generation, and many of the glaciers at low altitude could
disappear
in the next 20 years. In addition to the long-term loss of natural
freshwater
storage and their contribution to sea-level rise, the retreat of glaciers
affects aquatic ecosystems in several ways, sometimes even in a
catastrophic manner such as when glacial lake outburst floods occur.
Glacial
ecosystems are also increasingly understood as an hitherto poorly
recognized
player in the global carbon cycle. The accelerated deglaciation may thus
have numerous and complex consequences for downstream aquatic
ecosystems and for large-scale biogeochemistry. For instance, rapid glacial
retreat is creating new lakes where topography is suitable and is changing
the water transparency of turbid lakes. Furthermore it is altering the
ecohydrology of glacier-fed streams and may even mobilize pollutants that
can be transported to downstream ecosystems. This session invites
presentations that contribute to understand the consequences of vanishing
glaciers for the hydrology, biogeochemistry, biodiversity, and ecological
function of glacier-fed streams, lakes, and near-shore marine ecosystems.

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