FALL AGU sessions on Antarctic and Arctic Sea Ice

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FALL AGU sessions on Antarctic and Arctic Sea Ice

Stephen Ackley

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to draw your attention to the following sessions at the AGU Fall Meeting 2011 in San Francisco, California, USA (December 5th-9th 2011). 

C04.   Antarctic Sea Ice Processes and Climate (ASPeCt)   (Convenors:  Stephen Ackley and Marilyn Raphael)

and

C29: Rapid Changing Sea Ice in Arctic Ocean Under Global Warming (Convenors Zhijun Li and Hongjie Xie)

 

Abstract submission is now open at http://agu-fm11.abstractcentral.com/ and the deadline for submissions is 4 August 23:59 EDT/03:59 +1 GMT. You can find further details at http://www.agu.org/fallmeeting.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us should you have any questions about these sessions.

 

Regards,

Steve Ackley [hidden email]

Hongjie Xie  [hidden email]

 

Geol. Sciences Dept

Univ of Texas San Antonio (UTSA)

San Antonio TX 78249

(http://www.utsa.edu/lrsg)

 

 

C04.   Antarctic Sea Ice Processes and Climate (ASPeCt)   (Convenors:  Stephen Ackley and Marilyn Raphael)

The ASPeCt program had several sponsored activities during the last decade including Ice Station PolarStern, the Mertz and Ronne Polynya studies,and the joint IPY cruises, SIMBA and SIPEX. Remote sensing studies of IceSAT altimetry, passive and active microwave, and from the recent CryoSAT satellite have provided information on Antarctic sea ice. Process-related 1-D models of internal melting, snow-ice formation, and fully coupled models of air-ice-ocean interaction are providing better simulation of the large scale climatic interactions. Submissions on these and other topics related to Antarctic sea ice are therefore encouraged.

C29: Rapid Changing Sea Ice in Arctic Ocean Under Global Warming (Convenors Zhijun Li and Hongjie Xie)

Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, for example the Chukchi, Beaufort, and East Siberian seas, has been undergoing rapid change due to global warming. Since 2006, several ship-based expeditions have collected rich sea ice physical data sets and evidenced the rapid changes, for example, decreased sea ice extent, concentration, and thickness; increased melt pond coverage, and increases of both surface and bottom melt speed; possible widening of the marginal ice zone; and possible increased snow depth. This session aims to call studies primarily from those ship-collected data, and airborne and satellite-based data to document the sea ice processes and rapid change. Modeling results to predict possible future change are also welcomed.


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