Instrumentation towers in windy icing environments | suggestions?

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Instrumentation towers in windy icing environments | suggestions?

Chuck_Lindsay

Cryolisters,

Do you have experience with instrumentation towers in harsh environments
characterized by heavy icing and strong winds? If so, would you share your
experiences as to what equipment works well and what doesn't? Please
respond directly to me and I will compile any responses and post them to
Cryolist in the future.

I maintain meteorological stations with the anemometer and wind vane
mounted on an aluminum mast approximately 6 m above the ground surface. The
met stations are located in a maritime subarctic environment, and are
adjacent to glacier ice. A combination of heavy icing (10s kg) and strong
winds (>120 km/hr) have repeatedly snapped the masts during the past few
winters. I am looking for alternative instrumentation towers and am curious
what you have found to be successful in other similar environments.

Thanks in advance for any information,

Chuck Lindsay
National Park Service, Alaska

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Re: Instrumentation towers in windy icing environments | suggestions?

Josh Carmichael-2
UNAVCO and PASSCAL/IRIS has found a possible solution to similar problem concerning not met stations, but solar panels. They made a 'lampshade' design for masts that cut down on the wind cross section and simultaneously increased angular coverage for solar incidence. I bring this up because they may have thought about similar problems with their wind turbines as well, which more closely resemble your configuration. I would suggest contacting Tim Parker at PASSCAL, who heads the polar program.
Good luck!
josh

On Wed, May 9, 2012 at 12:20 PM, <[hidden email]> wrote:

Cryolisters,

Do you have experience with instrumentation towers in harsh environments
characterized by heavy icing and strong winds? If so, would you share your
experiences as to what equipment works well and what doesn't? Please
respond directly to me and I will compile any responses and post them to
Cryolist in the future.

I maintain meteorological stations with the anemometer and wind vane
mounted on an aluminum mast approximately 6 m above the ground surface. The
met stations are located in a maritime subarctic environment, and are
adjacent to glacier ice. A combination of heavy icing (10s kg) and strong
winds (>120 km/hr) have repeatedly snapped the masts during the past few
winters. I am looking for alternative instrumentation towers and am curious
what you have found to be successful in other similar environments.

Thanks in advance for any information,

Chuck Lindsay
National Park Service, Alaska

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--
Josh
--------------------------------
Joshua D Carmichael
Glaciology & Seismology
University of Washington/
Applied Physics Lab
Seattle WA
http://earthweb.ess.washington.edu/~joshuadc<http://earthweb.ess.washington.edu/%7Ejoshuadc>


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UNAVCO LAMPSHADE 002.jpg (252K) Download Attachment