Study light absorbing particulates in snow/ice? This AGU session is for you!

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Study light absorbing particulates in snow/ice? This AGU session is for you!

McKenzie Skiles
Since I know we all wanted to read about more AGU session on cryolist, I thought I would bring your attention to another great session- C011: Dust, Black Carbon, and other Aerosols in the Cryosphere. Our session grows every year, and the excellent research by students in our session has been consistently recognized through OSPA awards. Furthermore, this year we intentionally expanded the scope of our session to reach out to those study biological constituents in snow and ice and bioalbedo.

We are excited this year to welcome Marie Dumont and Joe Cook as our invited speakers.
Session Description:
Observation and modeling efforts have established the powerful regional impact on snow and ice cover from the deposition of light absorbing aerosols, such as mineral dust, carbonaceous particles, and biological constituents.  The subsequent darkening of the snow surface and initiation of snow albedo feedbacks has implications for the global climate and water cycle. This session will focus on observations and modeling of the past, present, and future impacts of mineral dust, carbonaceous particles, biological constituents, and other aerosols on snow and ice cover including transport and deposition processes, optical properties, impacts to albedo and snowmelt, glacier/ice sheet mass balance, and atmospheric heating.

See you in New Orleans, and don't forget the abstract deadline is August 2nd!

Cheers
McKenzie Skiles

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S. McKenzie Skiles, PhD

Assistant Professor
Department of Geography
University of Utah

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