Summer School on “Antarctic Climate Variability and Ice Dynamics” during 08-11 May 2017 at Goa (India)

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Summer School on “Antarctic Climate Variability and Ice Dynamics” during 08-11 May 2017 at Goa (India)

Dr. Thamban Meloth
The National Center for Antarctic and Ocean Research (NCAOR) and Norwegian Polar Institute (NPI) are organizing a summer school on “Antarctic climatevariability and ice dynamics”at NCAOR, Goa, during 08-11 May 2017. The targeted participants of the summer school are early-career scientists (MS/MTech/PhD students and postdoctoral scholars) who are studying earth science as a subject in any disciplines, who are at an early stage in glaciology and climate change studies .
The proposed summer school is organized in conjunction with the project workshop of the Indo-Norwegian research project “MADICE”, which just successfully completed its first field campaign to investigate mass balance, dynamics, and climate of the coastal Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (https://www.facebook.com/MADICEproject/).
The summer school includes lectures and hands-on sessions by experts from India and Norway, student presentations (oral or poster), and a tour of NCAOR’s ice-core laboratory and facilities. One hands-on session is dedicated on Quantarctica, a free GIS data package for Antarctica, developed by the NPI (http://quantarctica.npolar.no). Instructors are MADICE collaborators from NCAOR, NPI and UNIS (University Centre in Svalbard).
Applicants should send a single pdf document that includes short CV (less than 2 pages) and a letter of interest (1 page) by 20 March, 2017, to Dr. Thamban Meloth of NCAOR ([hidden email]). The summer school opportunity is open for all nationalities. Limited financial support towards travel/accommodation is available for participants from India. Indian applicants who are in need of financial support should make a separate application for the same and mention whether they can attend the summer school if the financial support cannot be provided. Acceptance notification will be sent by 31 March 2017.
 
Thamban Meloth, NCAOR ([hidden email]) & Kenny Matsuoka, NPI ([hidden email])
 
Lead PIs of the MADICE project
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Dr. Thamban Meloth | Scientist F & Group Director (Polar Sciences)|
ESSO-National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research |
Earth System Science Organization Ministry of Earth Sciences |
Headland Sada | Vasco-da-Gama Goa 403 804 |INDIA
Phone: +91-832-2525623 E-mail: [hidden email] 
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Wilford F. Weeks, 1929-2017

digbycarsey

Dear Ice and Snow Community,


Wilford Frank Weeks, known to all in the ice and snow community as Willy, died on Feb 10, 2017 at the home he shared with Marilyn Macdonald in Portland, Oregon. Willy had rapidly advancing terminal cancer and elected to use Oregon's Death With Dignity drugs, which he called "Bye-Bye Pills."  Marilyn and the rest of their family members were near at hand.

 

Willy was a part of the flowering of US science after WWII, taking a leading role in developing the rather new science of sea ice glaciology. His work was seminal in that field starting with a paper on sea ice load bearing in 1958.

 

Willy was born on January 8, 1929 in Champaign IL where he grew up. He graduated from Champaign High School in 1947 (National Honor Society); received his BS (Highest Honors, Bronze Tablet, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi) and MS degrees in geology in 1951 and 1953 from the University of Illinois; and his Ph.D. in the Earth Sciences (geochemistry) in 1956 from the University of Chicago. He was a research and development officer in the US Air Force becoming interested in the polar regions and in particular in the properties and behavior of sea ice. Upon discharge he taught earth science at Washington University in St. Louis for 5 years. In 1962, deciding that he was more interested in ice than in rocks, he joined the Snow and Ice Branch of the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) in Hanover, NH where he stayed until 1996.

 

During his time in CRREL Willy undertook a series of careful and demanding field and laboratory studies, examining sea ice structure in every ice-covered sea. He and coworkers pioneered in the study of sea ice as a material establishing a comprehensive catalog of profiles of electromagnetic, crystallographic, chemical and mechanical properties. This work involved over 40 field projects and more than 300 publications and reports. Anyone interested in sea ice as a component of the environment today will build on the firm foundation of that work. Later in his career Willy contributed to the establishment of the satellite record of the polar regions while he was faculty at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. By way of saying good-bye to glaciology Willy authored an encyclopedic book, On Sea Ice, Univ. of Alaska Press, 2010, which thoroughly covers the subject; it will serve as a valued reference for the foreseeable future. All of us who have worked in the polar regions owe Willy our heartfelt gratitude for his foundational work.

 

Willy’s definitive scientific publications are but a part of his overall contributions to the polar science community. He was a tireless documenter and supporter of polar science matters in the offices of the Washington science agencies as well as on international advisory committees. He was intellectually generous: To a vast crossection of scientists he was a trusted friend, colleague, sounding board, mentor, coauthor, and advisor; in addition, he was available as a foodie, reviewer of red wines, commentator on the passing scene, and traveling buddy. His sense of humor contained shades of Mark Twain's and had a habit of sneaking up when least expected. He was a raconteur of Arctic stories deep into the night.  If you asked Willy a question he answered it; if he considered your question a bit dumb he could be clear on that too.

 

Willy was the recipient of numerous honors including election to the National Academy of Engineering (1979), the US Army R&D Achievement Award (1967, 1981), the Seligman Crystal of the International Glaciological Society (1989), Fellowship in the American Geophysical Union (1989), Honorary Membership in the American Polar Society (1997), Usibelli Prize for Research (University of Alaska, 1996) and the Distinguished Alumni Award of the Department of Geology of the University of Illinois (2003).

 

Willy was also an accomplished musician who played violin and contrabass in Champaign schools. He augmented his musical perspective by learning the blues and playing bass with a variety of combos and dance bands that operated out of the Champaign-Urbana area during 1942-1952. He frequently commented that this was a wonderful experience for a kid in that it paid far better than detasseling corn, you learned all sorts of new words, and one met some very interesting ladies. He continued to study bass while at the University of Illinois and was a bassist in the U of I symphony having the good fortune to play in the famous concerts conducted by Stravinsky and Copeland. He continued his musical activities throughout his life, finally playing with several orchestras in the Portland area up until the time of his death.

 

Willy’s interests extended beyond sea ice and music.  He was engaged in the world; he and Marilyn traveled extensively in Asia, Africa, and South America, and of course he traveled extensively for professional reasons during his career. With his deep intellectual engagement Willy became one of the guides on any journey he took part in, including on many white-water rivers in the western US.  He and Marilyn collected art around the world and had a houseful of beautiful pieces. With only a few days to live he labored to finish a massive 3-volume history of the Civil War, regretting that he had to skim a bit to get to Appomattox Courthouse.

 

Throughout my career I have had the great fortune to personally know many excellent men and women active in our science; Willy was among the first. He was a friend of mine starting with AIDJEX where we met in 1974. I will miss him sorely, as will numerous other members of our profession. A world without him is a bit smaller, and I regret that Willy Weeks is no longer a friend I can drop in on. When you are next engaged in sharing a glass of something tasty with another follower of ice and show, lift one for Willy.

 

Frank Carsey

Bremerton WA

08 February 2017

 

PS: Willy was deliberate but he did not go gently into that good night. The Oregon cocktail which usually "transitions" patients through sleep to death in 10-20 minutes required almost exactly 3 days to ease his mind out of gear.

 


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